All posts tagged: reading

Five Top Tips for Reading More Books

I’m a big reader. I got off track logging my books as I read them in Goodreads this year to prove I met my goal of over 100, but I’m confident I did. No doubt about it, even without the proof, I know I’m well over it. So if you’ve been wishing you’d find a way to read more books, I’ve got the tips for you! (And no, I’m not going to tell you to stop watching television. I love TV too.) Last year I shared ideas for How to Read More Books in 2016, and I’m back today with five more top tips to help you along the way. I recommend reading the first post for the entry-level ideas to get started, and adding in these next five to level-up your reading habits. Give yourself a book budget. I don’t mean this as a way to decrease your book spending, but to increase it guilt-free. If you’ve set aside X dollars for books per month, it’s perfectly fine to spend the entire amount on …

YA Book Deals, Continued (Always)

I fell down a rabbit hole of YA ebook deals tonight, sooooooo here, benefit from my search. These are almost all $2 right now: Zeroes by Scott Westerfeld Tiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han Proof of Forever by Lexa Hillyer The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart 13 Little Blue Envelopes by Maureen Johnson You Were Here by Cori McCarthy Peaches by Jodi Lynn Anderson The Girl at Midnight by Melissa Grey All-American Girl by Meg Cabot More Than This by Patrick Ness The Nature of Jade by Deb Caletti Very Important Note: The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart is one of my all-time favorite anythings. I own two extra copies just for loaning or spontaneously gifting. It’s YA at its best. BRB, time to read. 😀

Two Tragedies

For your consideration. “In this world there are only two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.” ― Mr. Dumby (Act III) in Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan

To Be Read

As I worked on adding books to the floor-to-ceiling bookcases recently built in around the living room fireplace, I realized I didn’t have enough non-fiction in hardcopy to balance things out.  So I added a bunch to my wishlist and ended up with a new stack on my birthday. Perfect.  Coming Soon: bookcase photos, living room tour, and a post for each of these books. (Saying it here means I have to do it. Even if only I would remember if I didn’t.)

Quotable: Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

It’s summer and super hot, so this line I highlighted in my copy of Julie Murphy’s Dumplin’ jumped out at me and I wanted to share: There’s something about swimsuits that make you think you’ve got to earn the right to wear them. And that’s wrong. Really, the criteria is simple. Do you have a body? Put a swimsuit on it. If you’re a fan of John Green or Rainbow Rowell or interested in a book with a fat protagonist (or realistic characters who aren’t perfect or small town issues or Texas!), this one’s for you. Also, Julie is in my book club and I promise any money you spend on her books is going to someone you’d be happy to support. She’s great and so are her books.

YA Book Deals are My Favorite.

Looking to add some YA to your life? These are currently $1-3 for Kindle (and I bought them all, obvs). Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein Shadow and Bone (The Grisha #1) by Leigh Bardugo Lost Girls (Lost Girls #1) by Kate Ellison P.S. I Still Love You (To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before #2) by Jenny Han Kissing Ted Callahan (and Other Guys) by Amy Spalding If you’re completing my 2016 Reading Challenge, these will help you cross a few off the list.

Regency Writer and Gender Roles

“We don’t get many opportunities to be honorable.” “And that bothers you.” “I won’t bore you with complaints about being too rich or too privileged. It’s like saying, ‘They’ve given me far too much delicious cake.’” I’m reading a historical (Regency) romance novel right now that kicks off a series based on a group of women writers, their place in society at the time, and of course, their eventual love matches. I’m not very far into Forever Your Earl yet, but I’m enjoying the heroine’s observations on class, privilege, and gender roles so far, and the banter between her and the Earl is pretty great too. What I’m telling you is that I’m going to be early just so I can get back to reading and see what happens.