All posts filed under: feminism & equality

Veronica Mars: Iconic Feminist Show and Girl Detective

Veronica Mars: Iconic Feminist Show and Teen Girl Detective

Veronica Mars is one of my favorite television shows, and the title character is a fantastic depiction of a smart, vulnerable, brave, fallible young woman. If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend setting aside some time and watching the entire series. (If you’ve got Amazon Prime, it’s available for free there right now or it’s less than $20 per season.) Below I analyze a few episodes from the first season of Veronica Mars, in relation to feminist theory (and just because I love it). About the show In Veronica Mars, the main character, Veronica, attends school while moonlighting as a private investigator. (If you haven’t seen it yet, you may want to come back later, unless you’re one of those people who love spoilers.) Set in a fictional, affluent town called Neptune, California, Veronica Mars frequently covers issues of race and class division, and feminism is addressed through the struggles and triumphs of Veronica and her friends. Veronica is a cute, blonde, white girl from California who viewers may assume is more surfer girl or spoiled brat at first, …

Heartbroken and Looking for a Solution

Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Hospital in Dallas, speaking to Don Lemon tonight on CNN is breaking my heart. He’s so sad and struggling with dealing with not having saved all of the police officers on Thursday night. And he’s also a black man sharing how he’s treated differently when he’s not in his white coat. I don’t understand why people think it’s okay to kill police officers. I don’t understand why black men die in custody and they’re forgotten the next day. I don’t know why this has to be us against them. It has to stop. It has to stop. So how are we going to stop it?

Keep Dallas in your thoughts.

Watching video of a mass shooting in your own city is strange and sad and difficult. Keep Dallas, and the DPD, and everyone who was at the protest in your thoughts. (The Dallas Morning News is providing fantastic coverage, with an understanding of the city often not found in national media, if you need an update.) Let’s also try to remember the protest before the shooting. It was peaceful and had the support of the police department. Demonstration in #Dallas @ Belo Garden Park pic.twitter.com/IUx5IaERSB — Dallas Police Depart (@DallasPD) July 8, 2016 And remember: This is from 2014, but is so incredibly relevant today. I miss Jon Stewart's Daily Show. This is how I feel. #Dallas pic.twitter.com/3BiQ0AoaAT — David Thomas (@NOTDavidThomas) July 8, 2016 I know there are police officers doing good work every day, including many in Dallas, where Chief Brown has turned the department toward community policing and deescalation over the past few years. And I appreciate them. But that doesn’t make those who aren’t doing the right thing less deserving of being held accountable. …

Justice Sotomayor is Right.

When I saw the news of Alton Sterling being killed by police last night, I was reminded of a dissent I’d recently read by Justice Sotomayor. I have a feeling the story the police give about why they approached Sterling, and why deadly force was used and is okay, will not being something with which I agree. Extrajudicial execution is NOT OKAY and it’s against what we’re supposed to stand for as Americans. Each time, this is heartbreaking, for every victim of this kind of treatment by police, and every black person who watches these things happen over and over and feels hurt, less welcome, less cared for, and that they are treated as less than fully American. It breaks my heart, and I’m watching from the view of being white. I can only imagine what it feels like from the other side, and it’s too much. And I know there are police officers out there every day not doing these horrible things, but even when acting within the law, our punishments have gotten out of control. Expecting citizens to be okay …

Support Feminist Frequency’s Ordinary Women

Have you seen the crowdfunding campaign for Ordinary Women: Daring to Defy History? It’s a new video series by Feminist Frequency “about challenging stereotypes, smashing the status quo, and being defiant.” And I really, really hope it gets funded. We’re overdue for telling history in a way that truly and completely includes women, beyond their roles on the sideline. (Speaking of history, I really hope the National Women’s History Museum becomes a reality soon, too.) Check Ordinary Women and donate!

Hey, Y’all

Last year I wrote about what I think about “y’all” (see: Mullenweg, y’all) and how I made an effort to start using it again, after many years not. It really is a fantastic word, especially for a gender-neutral way to address a group of people. I cringe when someone refers to a group I’m in as “guys” and wish the person would try another word every time, and for me that word is y’all. And now The Atlantic has caught on and agrees. America Needs ‘Y’all’: English has no standard second-person plural word, and it’s time for that to change. (Also, now I want to watch Friday Night Lights, y’all.)